Novartis launches first large-scale smartphone MS study

August 23, 2017
Novartis has launched a mobile research study for people with multiple sclerosis that collects data via their smartphone, without the need for clinic visits. The researchers aim to improve understanding of the daily challenges patients with MS have, and to uncover new potential measurements of treatment effectiveness through real-time data collection from participants in their everyday life.
 
Using smartphones, the Evaluation of Evidence from Smart Phone Sensors and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Participants with Multiple Sclerosis (elevateMS) study will capture participant responses to questionnaires, passive and active sensor-based movement data, and functional performance tasks completed by the participants. The mobile app was designed with input from patients, neurologists, and advocates.
 
The elevateMS study is open to U.S. participants with and without MS. Participants can leave the study at any time. Participants will be able to use the application to view how their data changes over time. Researchers will use data they collect to understand what it is like to live with MS. The names of participants will be replaced with a random code, so the researchers and study sponsor Novartis won't know the individual's identity.
 
To download the app and enroll in the study, visit itunes.apple.com/us/app/elevatems/id1233909485?ls=1&mt=8. Additional information about the elevateMS study is available at www.elevatems.org.

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