Study: Diet may help reduce disability and MS symptoms

December 20, 2017
A new study suggests that for people with multiple sclerosis, eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains may be linked to having less disability and fewer symptoms than people whose diet is less healthy. According to the study’s author, this study does not determine whether a healthy lifestyle reduces MS symptoms or whether having severe symptoms makes it harder for people to engage in a healthy lifestyle, however it provides evidence for the link between the two.
 
The study by researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., involved 6,989 people with all types of MS who completed questionnaires about their diet. The definition of a healthy diet focused on eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains and less sugar from desserts and sweetened beverages and less red meat and processed meat. The participants were divided into five groups based on how healthy their diet was.
 
Researchers also assessed whether participants had an overall healthy lifestyle, which was defined as having a healthy weight, getting regular physical activity, eating a better than average diet and not smoking.
 
The participants were also asked whether they had a relapse of MS symptoms or a gradual worsening of symptoms in the past six months. They reported their level of disability and how severe their symptoms were in areas such as fatigue, mobility, pain, and depression.
 
People in the group with the healthiest diet were 20 percent less likely to have more severe physical disability than people in the group with the least healthy diet. Individuals with the healthiest diets also were also around 20 percent less likely to have more severe depression than individuals with the least healthy diet.
 
Those with the best diet ate an average of 1.7 servings of whole grains per day, compared to 0.3 servings per day for those with the least healthy diet. For fruits, vegetables, and legumes (not including French fries), the top group had 3.3 servings per day while the bottom group had 1.7 servings per day.
 
People with an overall healthy lifestyle were nearly 50 percent less likely to have depression, 30 percent less likely to have severe fatigue and more than 40 percent less likely to have pain than people who did not have a healthy lifestyle.
 
The study also looked at whether people followed a specific diet, including popular diets such as Paleo, weight-loss plans, or diets that have been touted in self-help books and websites as beneficial for people with MS, such as the Wahls’ diet. The researchers found that overall, past or current use of these diets was associated with modestly reduced risk of increased disability.
 
The researchers said one limitation of the study is that because of the study’s design, it cannot be known if healthy diets predict changes to MS symptoms in the future. Another limitation was that the participants mostly tended to be older, mainly white, and had been diagnosed with MS for an average of nearly 20 years, so the results may not be applicable to everyone with MS.
 
The study was published in the online issue of Neurology.

MS Focus Lending Library


Books, DVDs, and CDs are available for loan, by mail across the United States.
Learn more

Study uncovers potential risks of common MS treatment


Study finds an increased risk of events such as stroke, migraine, and depression, and abnormalities in the blood with taking beta interferon for MS.
Learn more

Study: Immunotherapy may provide neuroprotection in MS

October 17, 2018

Researchers could be in a position to achieve neuroprotection without shutting down protective immune responses or blood clotting.
Learn more